Tag Archives: perfect storm

T3 2/2

Since the drive to the ED will take a while, I strike up a conversation with Mrs. Duval to pass the time.

“They built this place maybe three years ago, how long have you lived here?”

“We moved here after the hurricane sir.” She has a polite manner and a southern twang. – apparently a transplant after hurricane Katrina. I’ve run into a lot of people who have relocated here after the hurricane. There are no definitive numbers because of the chaos at the time, but estimates are that over one million people were scattered around the country. Some have since gone back, some are still displaced.

“Do you like it here?” This area is a destination for many across the US who would love to move here, although not necessarily to the Projects – but to this general area. I’m curious about here perspective.

“It’s okay sir, but we don’t fit in so well.” I wish she wouldn’t call me sir but something tells me I couldn’t stop her.

“There’s a lot of crime in this area – are you guys doing okay?” The city PD call this area Beat-55x; it’s one of the worst in the city.

“Oh yes sir, we do fine, don’t no one bother us too much. It’s just not what we used to you know?” I’ve spent some time in the south and I know that our version of the hood is a lot different than their version. For starters no one in my hood has ever called me sir except for this charming lady.

“Do you have family here?” I’m curious to know what kind of support structure she may have.

“No sir. They all over the place after the hurricane.” Families were broken up, support structures destroyed, people displaced. Some never reconnected – it’s not like they are on Facebook and can post a status update to their wall.

“Your husband’s pretty sick. Does he always go to the emergency room or does he see a regular doctor?” I already know the answer.

“We don’t have a car sir. This the only way we can get there. I don’t understand though, he gets betta for a few day, then he has to go back. They jus can’ seem to make him betta.” It’s common – we see it all the time. It’s the other trifecta: poverty, location, and lack of education.

“You know, it’s the high blood pressure that’s the big problem right now. Is he taking his medication?” It may not be his biggest problem but you have to start somewhere.

“Yes sir. I make sure he take it every day.” She obviously loves him and she’s worried about him. But the care that they get from an emergency room will never fix this. Emergency rooms just treat them and street them. They seldom take the time to explain the overall condition, much less the causality and eventual complications. The mechanism for continuing care is non existent – there is no such thing as a house call.

“I’ve spent a lot of time in the south; that’s where my mother’s people are from. I know what y’all eat down there – lotsa fried food and salt. You know he can’t be eat’n that.” Possibly gaining a little rapport with the remnants of a southern twang that never really stuck with me.

“Oh, yes sir, I know but he like to taste his food. He always put the salt on.” No wonder his blood pressure is into gasket-blowing range.

“How bout the sweet tea, I know y’all like some sweet tea. How much sugar you put in a sweet tea?”

“Oh yes sir, he love the sweet tea. I put ‘bout a cup in a pitcha.” Yikes! A diabetic drinking that much sugar??

“You ever hear of Splenda? He’s got the diabetes, he can’t be takin’ that much sugar.” I can see the headlines now; Paramedic prescribes Splenda; man dies of cancer. Hell, but what else can I do at this point?

As I’m explaining sugar and salt substitutes I realize that Kevin has been having an almost identical conversation in the back of the rig. There’s nothing emergent to treat here – it’s their lifestyle that needs treatment and they’re not going to get it from the hospital. She tells me that she tries to help him but he won’t listen to her. She pleads with me to tell him these things because maybe he’ll hear it coming from a man.

Once at the hospital Kevin gives a report to the charge nurse and I’ve got a minute to lay it on thick for him. I cover all the points that we talked about: limiting salt, no sugar, no fried foods, eat a vegetable for God’s sake.

“Do you think this could kill me sir?” He’s a little scared with a small voice on the verge of tearing up.

“It will if you don’t fix it. Look at it like this: you didn’t have diabetes when you were a kid right?” He shakes his head. “Well, now you do and you take a pill every day to control it, but right now your blood sugar is super high. In a year you’ll have to take a shot twice a day to control it. That means sticking a needle in your belly every morning and every night. You don’t want that do you?”

“No sir, I don’t ever want to do that. Thank you sir, thank you for explaining it to me.” I didn’t give him an explanation, really, I just gave him some precautions and scared him with some possible results. It’s not enough and I know it. I even went to the EMS break room and grabbed a hand full of Splenda and gave it to the wife. They were both so appreciative and thanked me repeatedly, but still I know it’s not enough. Ultimately they escaped a hurricane and landed in the perfect storm.

After cleaning up the rig I went back in and had a conversation with the charge nurse. I learned that they have no one in the hospital for dietary consultation. Maybe, if he was admitted to the floor, they could call in a consult from their network of hospitals. I also learned that the county hospital has better dietary consults than this private hospital. Apparently they’ve cut all the “non-essential” programs. The Governator has already laid the ground work for further cuts to police, firefighters, hospitals, home health care, and education. Unbelievable!

I don’t pretend to have the answers yet I see the problems every day. This man needs a dietary consultation and someone to check on him once a week. Someone to go through the cabinets and suggest substitutes for poor eating habits. Someone to take him on a field trip to a dialysis center and see the sad people sitting in their chairs for three and four hours at a time – watching their blood get siphoned off and returned. The answer is not to spend more on health care. We need to give people the health care that they need and stop passing the responsibilities off to the next shift and by extrapolation passing the responsibilities off to the next generation.

This is the Trifecta cubed: T3

 

Hypertension –> Diabetes + Heart Disease

Location –> Lack of Education + Poverty

Poor Economy –> Unemployment + Cuts to Social Services

 

The perfect storm…the only question is which horse comes in first?