Tag Archives: human trafficking

Traffic 2/2

As I push the gurney through the sally port towards the ambulance with our police escorts, I’m able to have a few moments to myself to ponder the situation. I’ve transported many prisoners in the past and often pick up violent offenders off the streets fresh from a well deserved police “attitude adjustment” requiring a trip to the ED. But somehow this is different. This isn’t a random act of violence or even a simple premeditated crime. This man is potentially the perpetrator of organized subjugation of innocent children. The level of pure evil that spawns this behavior is unfathomable to me and I’m having a bit of a hard time with the whole situation.

I load the gurney into the ambulance and tell Kevin that I’m just going to fire off a quick 12-lead and we can start transporting. It won’t affect my transport decision as the police requested a hospital that is also a cardiac receiving center, but I need to know if this warrants alerting the cath-team if my new patient actually is having a STEMI (S-T Elevation Myocardial Infarction – heart attack). Given his skin signs and level of distress, though, I highly doubt he is.

With the 12-lead complete – normal as expected – the police cruiser pulls in behind us for an escort to the ED as we start transporting. The rote task of taking vitals and applying the monitor to a patient that I can’t talk to gives me a few more minutes to contemplate my emotional state. On the one hand I may have evil incarnate strapped to my gurney, sitting only inches from me, and that brings a flood of emotions to the surface that I’m entirely uncomfortable experiencing. On the other hand, this is a patient and I’m a Paramedic – end of story! My job is to treat the problem in front of me and be an advocate for a patient who can’t even convey his needs due to a language barrier. Conflicting emotions and logical arguments fly through my head at synaptic speed – like strobes on an ambulance – and quickly resolve in the blink of an eye.

I fall into the sequential tasks of treating my non-English speaking patient for chest pain; aspirin, oxygen, vitals, IV, nitroglycerine, vitals, nitro, etc… “Here, chew this up, don’t swallow,” I tell him as I make a chewing motion with my mouth and move my hand like a hungry sock puppet and hand him the aspirin. “Did you take any Viagra today?” Stupid question, he’s in jail, I’m a little off my game here. He shrugs in non-comprehension. I spray the nitro in his mouth. Whatever, if I crash his blood pressure out I’ll try to fix it and apologize to the docs at the ED.

The ambulance comes to a stop on the freeway as there is an accident in front of us. We heard it get dispatched as we responded to this call but I guess Kevin is a little off of his game as well since he didn’t use surface streets to bypass the congestion. I can see the police escort sitting just behind us – in the stopped traffic – through the back window of the rig.

Pulling the stethoscope from my ears after the latest check on vitals my patient turns to look me square in the eyes. In heavily accented broken English he speaks to me in a quiet voice. “I can see that you a very nice man. Is all a mistake. They not my bitches, they my sisters… I have much money. I give you. You let me go!”

  • Child trafficking is one of the fastest growing crimes in the world.
  • There are 2.5 million child sex slaves in the world today, some as young as 4 and 5.
  • More than 1,000,000 children worldwide will become victims of child trafficking this year.
  • Over 100,000 children in the U.S. are currently exploited through commercial sex, and 300,000 children in the U.S. are at risk every year for commercial sexual exploitation.
  • Investigators and researchers estimate the average predator in the U.S. can make more than $200,000 a year off one young girl.
  • The global market of child trafficking is over $12 billion a year.
  • The total market value of illicit human trafficking is estimated to be over $32 billion a year.
  • An estimated 14,500-17,500 foreign nationals are trafficked into the U.S. each year.
  • Approximately 80% of human trafficking victims are women and girls and up to 50% are minors.
  • 600,000-800,000 people are bought and sold across international borders each year; 50% are children, most are female.  The majority of these victims are forced into the sex trade.
  • There are open sex slavery cases in all 50 states.
  • U.S. citizen child victims are often runaway and homeless youth.
  • Runaways, orphans and the poor are targets for sexual predators.
  • Approximately 80% of trafficking involves sexual exploitation, and 19% involves labor exploitation.
  • There are more slaves today than ever before in human history.

Information from various sources ~ U.S. Dept. of Justice, U.S. Dept. of State, UNICEF, UN, UNODC

As long as the mind is enslaved, the body can never be free. Psychological freedom, a firm sense of self-esteem, is the most powerful weapon against the long night of physical slavery.

Martin Luther King, 1967

Traffic 1/2

traf·fic

1 : the passage of people or vehicles along routes of transportation; traffic congestion

2 : dealings, business, or intercourse

3 : social or verbal exchange; communication

4 : buying and selling; barter; trade, sometimes of a wrong or illegal kind

5 : to carry on trade or business, especially of an illicit kind; human trafficking

The lock on the heavy jail cell door releases and the door slides open with mechanical precision, making a loud clunk which reverberates off of the austere concrete walls of the sally port (a double-door safety system that they have in prisons. From the outside, you go through one door, and when it closes and locks, the second door opens to let you into the interior). Standing in front of me is the fire captain who’s taking information from the jail’s processing officer – he looks up long enough to point us down a hall. We continue walking down the hallway of holding cells and I see freshly processed prisoners, still wearing their street clothes, sitting on benches in their cells watching the procession of uniforms glide past their limited view through the bars. In the open cell at the end of the hall I finally see my patient – a man in handcuffs, leg shackles, and an orange jump-suit – sitting on the bench with firefighters taking vitals and four very large officers keeping an eye on things.

Finally, I see a friendly face – the fire medic stands up to give me a quick report. “Hey KC, so it’s your basic incarceritis. Forty-eight year old male, chest pain by three hours, vitals normal, no primary symptoms. That’s about all we have unless you speak Mandarin.”

“Sweet! No problem.” I step around the medic and address the prisoner. “Ni hao ma?” In perfect intonation I ask him how he’s doing in a typical Mandarin greeting. Fortunately I grew up in the Chinese community of my home city and know enough Chinese to order dinner, get my face slapped, and yell like a drill sergeant at a class full of kung-fu students. Unfortunately, it’s all in Cantonese and I just exhausted my Mandarin repertoire.

The prisoner stands up with a hopeful look on his face and fires off an excited string of Mandarin. “好. 这些人不相信我. 我有胸部疼痛.”

In unison the firefighters and officers look at me to see if I can tell them what’s going on. “Sorry man, that’s all I got, let’s go to the hospital.” I motion to the gurney as he does the shackled penguin waddle out of the holding cell. Kevin and I put on the leather hand restraints as the officer takes off the handcuffs. I’ll need access to his arms to treat him, yet he’s still in custody.

As we’re walking past the rows of holding cells I’m asking one of the officers what’s going on. “Yeah, we used the translation service on the phone, he said he has chest pain and knows that no one will believe him so we called you guys.”

“What’s he in for?” I always ask as I want to get an idea of how dangerous someone is – it doesn’t affect my treatment but it’s nice to get a heads up if I’m going to be sitting in close proximity to a violent criminal.

“We picked him up yesterday on a sting-op. Busted about a dozen brothels in a couple different counties. These guys were trafficking young girls from Asia on container ships and forcing them into prostitution. This guy was pimping out girls as young as thirteen! I tell ya’, right now, I hope he is having a heart attack – he deserves it!” Damn!