Tag Archives: bounty hunter

Flight of Fancy Postscript

post·script

1 – a note, paragraph, etc. added to the end of a letter or at the end of a book, speech, etc. as an afterthought or to give supplementary information

Three days after leaving my mostly urban county by helicopter the young man in question was extubated and regained consciousness with no lasting deficits. The trauma surgeons in my county trauma center made the right call in sending him to the specialists at University Hospital. And, as much as I may have some misgivings about the use of an air ambulance in an urban setting, I believe it was the right choice of transportation.

Most forward thinkers in the pre-hospital setting are fairly skeptical of the use of helicopters for all but the extended transport times in rural settings. A flight time of twenty minutes can easily be extended to over an hour when all factors are taken into consideration; travel time to the scene, landing and unloading, assessment and loading the patient, landing and unloading the patient at the hospital. In many cases where the benefit may be minimal the right answer is to drive the patient and get to definitive care faster.

In this case I believe the use of the helicopter was warranted given the time of day and general unstable nature of the patient. In the midst of morning rush hour the normal drive time of 48 minutes would be extended to nearly two hours even with the use of Code-3 lights and siren. The geographical choke points of bridges and waterways create near gridlock traffic situations where an ambulance literally has no place to push the traffic out of the way.

It’s easy to get jaded in a busy urban environment like this. My initial impression of this escapade was that of skeptical acquiescence. The decisions about where and how this patient is transported are very far beyond my control once the doctors put things into motion. It’s also easy to lose a little bit of feeling or caring for someone who intentionally put themself in danger to satisfy the cravings of an addiction. Violence and trips to the ED are unfortunate byproducts of the environment for people who engage in this lifestyle. Just as a Paramedic may have very little sympathy for an injured drunk driver – we may have the same lack of compassion for someone who intentionally drives into the hood at four in the morning to score drugs. As a byproduct of their misadventure lives are put at risk while driving Code-3 and flying helicopters in a very busy airspace. That is a risk we will take when an innocent life is on the line yet it’s hard to justify when we are put in that position by someone’s poor choice of lifestyle.

Yet my impression of this patient changed a few days later when an officer involved in this case told me that the patient had bounty hunter credentials on him at the time of the shooting. Was he actually trying to clean up the streets rather than contributing to the problems in the hood? I don’t know, I will likely never know, but it does serve to remind me that it is not our job to judge people. We are here to fix who we can, keep them alive as long as we can, and deliver them to definitive care with all haste. That’s what it is to be a Paramedic.