Necromancy Revisited 1/2

nec·ro·man·cy

1 : the practice of communicating with and learning from the dead to predict the future

2 : see also – necromancer; one who practices divination by conjuring up the dead

re·vis·it·ed

1  :  to visit again

2  :  to re-examine (a topic or theme) after an interval, with the view to making a fresh appraisal

The phone is ringing in the bank manager’s office, which is odd. The last time the hostage negotiator called the phone rang at the teller’s window. Thinking that possibly there has been some progress on getting his demands met, he walks to the ringing phone and picks it up with his left hand as his right hand holds down the “dead man’s switch” – a button that needs to be pressed to keep the bomb from going off. If he takes his finger off the trigger, his vest will explode.

“What do you want?” With the anticipation of talking to the hostage negotiator on the other end he’s already setting the tone with an aggressive stance yet no one answers him. Looking up from the phone and out the window he sees a tiny puff of smoke on the adjacent building that is quickly followed by a round hole in the window and spider web crack lines extending to the frame.

That was the last thing he saw as the bullet from the police sniper travelled through his head. He releases the “dead man’s switch” as he falls back, but he never hits the floor – his vest explodes, sending shrapnel and body parts throughout the building.

From forty yards away, staging with my police escorts and the rest of my EMS team I see the fifty-foot ball of fire come out of the window. Crap! Now I have hostages with blast injuries. This is going to be a very bad day!

I walk into the command post to meet the SWAT team leader and get the briefing prior to the assault to attempt resolution of the hostage situation. Camouflaged SWAT members are checking gear and loading weapons as the commander calls for our attention.

“Okay gentlemen, this our latest intel.” The SWAT commander is pointing to a rough floor plan drawn on a white board. “We have three tangos holding approximately ten hostages. I’m getting real-time intel from sniper teams who are in place now. They report the leader has an explosive vest and the FBI SWAT team just raided their home base and found bomb-making material. The good news is that it’s just a black powder device so we’re not dealing with high-yield C-4. The bad news is that we don’t know what the triggering device is or how it’s connected.

“In approximately ten minutes your SWAT team will rappel down from the sixth floor to the mezzanine level. You will then stack along the west wall at which time we will call the phone in this office. It is our expectation that the tango with the explosive vest will answer the phone, at which time our sniper will take out the target. We are told that a single shot from a .308 will weaken the window and allow entry. You will take your team through that window and eliminate the additional tangos. Remember, you have a room with approximately ten civilians.

“Once you secure the room you will call for EMS. They will be staging down the block and enter through the front door. You will provide force protection while they address any life threatening injuries and extricate any wounded. EMS, remember you are entering a warm zone which was hot just a minute prior. I need the SWAT team leader and EMS team leader to come together on how to work together and extricate any wounded with all haste while staying safe. That is all gentlemen; you have ten minutes.”

The SWAT commander walks out on his way to the forward command post as the SWAT team leader, Vinny, and I look over the rough floor plan together. Vinny’s a serious man dressed in his camouflage uniform with an imposing M-4 rifle slung over his shoulder.

Vinny is pointing to the floor plan on the wall and walking me through their method of clearing the room. “Once we have the tangos down I’ll set an internal perimeter and secure egress through the front doors. I’ll alert you via radio that it’s clear to enter. We’ll give you two operators, with your team, on force protection. How are you going to work the room?” He’s a no-nonsense, straightforward kind of guy who seems to know his business.

“That sounds good. I’ll start on a clockwise lap of the room to get a patient count and identify the first out critical patients. As I tag the wounded I’ll spin my guys off on treatment and facilitating egress. I’ll want to stage the wounded for pick-up and transport to the left of the entrance. We have rigs staging, ready to do a drive by and transport to the hospital. It would help if I can use some of your guys to help cary people out. If any of the wounded are heavy it may take four people to get them out.”

“Easy enough, I’ll send you two operators at a time when you need them. Otherwise we’ll stay out of your way and let you work on the wounded. You good?”

“Yeah, I’m good, stay safe.” A blue nitrile fist hits a tactical glove fist and we return to our respective teams for final preparation.

From my vantage point, a half block away, I see ten ropes fall to the ground on the west wall of the building. In a silent rappel, ten SWAT operators slide down the ropes and fall into a stack formation at the corner of the building.

The radio on the officer next to me crackles to life. “Sam one in position.” It’s Vinny on his throat-mic, telling the commander that he’s ready in a whisper.

“Tac-com copies, Sam one. Sniper two, do you have visual?” The tactical commander is getting ready to put things in motion.

“Sniper two, clean line of sight, we are go.”

“Tac-com copies. All teams we are go in ten seconds. Out.”

After waiting for what seems like an eternity, everything happens at once. The sniper fires and the sound of breaking glass is quickly followed by a huge explosion; a fireball comes out of the broken window. As soon as the flames recede, Vinny’s team moves around the corner in lethal stack formation and enters the building. A few seconds later the rapid fire of the M-4 can be heard from the inside of the building. Short bursts of six shots followed by another short burst of eight shots. Some sporadic returning fire and then the final burst of six shots echo out of the building.

The radio crackles to life again. “Three tangos down. Initiating final sweep now.”

The officer next to me leads us up to the forward staging area just twenty feet from the front doors. I can see movement through the windows as the SWAT operators are clearing the room and securing weapons. Smoke is still pouring out of the office window where the explosion came from. Two SWAT operators force open the front doors and secure the egress while the radio crackles again; “Code-4, EMS is clear to enter.”

“Copy. EMS coming in now.” I lead my team towards the front doors.

 

 

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