Impact 4/4

Driving home I see the text message from my wife telling me that she couldn’t stay awake any longer and is going to bed. I got held over by three hours tonight and it’s well past midnight before I make it home.

I give my wife a kiss and pet the dogs who are asleep in their monogrammed dog beds on my wife’s side of our bed.  Sleepy eyes look up from the pillow, “How was your day?”

“Busy, I’ll tell you about it tomorrow love, go back to sleep. I love you.”

I spend an hour in the hot tub – cool wind in the trees and stars overhead – tying to let the adrenaline dissipate from my system and introspectively looking for answers while listening to the lonely call of an owl sitting in a nearby tree.

Don goes to the middle east, putting his life on the line for his country, while getting shot at by the Iraqi version of bangers in their very real killing fields. In an effort to help his fellow serviceman even more he starts medical training and gets shot at by local bangers – the very people whose freedoms he swore to protect – in the domestic version of the killing fields.

Of all people to shoot at, why shoot at EMS? We are the best chance a banger has when they get shot. We are their ONLY advocate and our single purpose is to make sure they don’t die – a job that we have become quite proficient at over the years. In the summer months of this year 204 people were shot in the urban city that comprises most of my county. Of those 204 people only 11 people died. That’s a survival rate of 95%.

In the world of modern medicine we are able to keep the elderly alive long past their bodies’ ability to function – giving their families just a little more time with grandma and grandpa. That same modern medicine seems to also be keeping the violent offenders alive through multiple life threatening altercations and solidifying their personal self image of indestructibility – thereby prolonging and intensifying the violent behavior. In the dark ages a ruffian would have died from infection following a minor cut in a knife fight. Yet today I have many patients with multiple laceration and GSW scars that tell the tale of escalating violence – and by extrapolation an escalation of PTSD, dissociative violent behavior, depression, and many other mental afflictions. It’s possible that the ability of the physical body to cope with trauma has out-paced the mind’s ability to cope with the effects of the same trauma.

As I lay in bed – wife and dogs sleeping peacefully near me – I wonder if my mind has the same limitations to cope with the trauma that I bear witness to – and occasionally participate in – on a daily basis.

One week later Jim tells me that the victim in the GSW that we worked was a friend of his neighbor. He was attending a Quinceañera party – the celebration of a Latina’s fifteenth birthday where she transitions from childhood to being considered an adult. He had a perforated right lung and ruptured pancreas as the bullet had a straight trajectory in a downward angle from right mid-axially, bouncing off of the left iliac arch. He spent three days in the ICU under sedation. Upon waking up he told the nurses that he wants to meet with Jim and I to thank us for saving his life. That should be interesting.

His shooter was arrested one day later and is expected to be charged with assault with a firearm and attempted murder. The motive for the shooting was a gang initiation test to shoot a random person.

The suspect that shot up our ambulance is still unknown…

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