Service 1/4

ser·vice

1 : of or relating to the armed forces of a nation

2 : work done for others as an occupation, business, or calling

3 : services, such as free medical care, provided by a government for its disadvantaged citizens, often used in the plural

4 : the act of a male animal copulating with a female animal

Consciously or unconsciously, every one of us does render some service or other. If we cultivate the habit of doing this service deliberately, our desire for service will steadily grow stronger, and will make, not only our own happiness, but that of the world at large. ~Mahatma Gandhi

“Prostitute at five-o’clock, look out the back window to your left.”

“Really!!?” Brittany scuttles to the back of the rig and peers out the rear windows like a ten year old looking under the tent flap at the circus.

“See the bored looking guy with the baggy pants, about twenty yards up the street? That’s the pimp.”

“Oh my god!! She just got in the car!” Brittany is actually squealing with excitement.

The back of the rig is dark and I can just barely make out Brittany’s silhouette in the rear-view mirror as her digital camouflage fades her into the background.

I met Brittany this morning as I was checking out my equipment from the deployment coordinator and he told me I have a ride-along today. Looking behind me I see a young woman in military digital camouflage; her hair is pulled tight into a bun at the back of her head and she’s standing in the corner holding a matching backpack, curiously looking around at the ambulance bay and the bustle of other crews stocking their rigs.

We often get EMT student ride-alongs in this county – it’s a mandatory component of graduation to ride with an ambulance crew on the streets. Some ride-alongs are from the military while others are from the local schools, and they span the full range of personalities and competency. For many of the local students, this is just a necessary yet annoying stepping stone on the way to the elusive job in a fire department. Some will make it that far but most will fall by the wayside. The military ride-alongs take it much more seriously, and as a result I much more enjoy having them. We get riders from the Army, Marines, Navy, and Coast Guard. These tend to be dedicated young men and women who are disciplined, motivated, and courteous. Because of the constant state of war over the last decade these young people know that the skills they learn in EMT school could vary well make a difference in future deployments. They tend to be very motivated, ask lots of questions, and are respectful to patients and personnel from the other agencies that we work with throughout the day. The military commanders know that the best chance of seeing domestic urban warfare happens to be on the streets of my Big City so we tend to get a lot of riders from the different branches of the military.

As I’m introducing myself to Brittany and handing her my computer to carry to the rig I hear another military ride-along nervously talking to the deployment coordinator. “Are you serious, you don’t issue flack jackets?” Brittany’s eyes get big and round at that question – a look that I see repeatedly throughout the day.

Brittany helps Kevin and I check out the rig as we explain where all of the equipment is stored and promise to get her as much hands on experience with patients as possible. As we clear the deployment center and notify dispatch that we are available for the Big City, Brittany looks down at the body armor poking out of my gear bag and her big round eyes meet mine in the rear view mirror.

“Don’t worry about it, we’ll keep you safe. We haven’t lost a rider yet.”

“So you’re not counting the last guy?” Kevin comes back at me with our well rehearsed schtick.

“Nah, he doesn’t count, he was an idiot! Brittany’s much smarter than him.”


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